BRIDGET M. MARSHALL

Associate Professor of English

University of Massachusetts, Lowell

Lowell, Massachusetts 01854

978-934-4179

bridget_marshall@uml.edu

http://faculty.uml.edu/bmarshall/index.html

__________________________________________________________________

EDUCATION

Ph.D., English & American Literature, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  September 2004.

Dissertation: "Narrative Justice: The Gothic and the Law in Anglo-America, 1790 - 1860"

 

M.A., English & American Literature, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  Fall 1999.

 

B.A., Double major in English Literature and Classical Civilization, Summa cum laude, Departmental Honors in English and Classics. Lehigh University, 1996.

 

ACADEMIC PUBLICATIONS IN PRINT

Books

Elbert, Monika, and Bridget M. Marshall. Co-Editors. Transnational Gothic: Literary and Social Exchanges in the Long Nineteenth Century. Ashgate. January 2013.

Marshall, Bridget M. The Transatlantic Gothic Novel and the Law, 1790 – 1860. Ashgate. January 2011.

Book Chapters

Marshall, Bridget M. “Suicide as Justice? The self-destroying Gothic villain in Pauline Hopkins’ Of One Blood.” Suicide and the Gothic. Ed. William Hughes and Andrew Smith. Manchester: Manchester University Press, August 2019. 96 – 109.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Fright Factories: Nineteenth-Century Industrial Gothic.” Gothic Peregrinations: The Unexplored and Re-explored Territories. Ed. Agnieszka Lowcazanin and Katarzyna Malecka. New York: Routledge, 2018. 163 – 179.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Romanticism, Gothic, and the Law.” Law and Literature.  Ed. Kieran Dolin. Cambridge University Press, 2018. 142 – 156.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Things as They’re Told: The Power of Narrative in William Godwin’s Caleb Williams.” Gothic Topographies: Language, Nation Building and ‘Race.’ Ed. Paivi Mehtonen and Matti Savolainen. Ashgate. 2013. 43 – 55.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Southern Gothic: Background and History.” Southern Gothic Literature. Ed. Jay Ellis. Salem Press. April 2013. 3 – 18.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Who Cares about Plagiarism? Cheating and Consequences in the Pop Culture Classroom.” Critical Conversations about Plagiarism. Eds. Anne Meade Stockdell-Giesler, Tracy Ann Morse, Rebecca Ingalls, Michael Donnelly, and Joanna Castner. Parlor Press. November 2012. 137 - 150.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Comics as Primary Sources: The Case of Journey into Mohawk Country.” Comic Books and American Cultural History. Ed. Matthew J. Pustz. New York: Continuum, February 2012. 26 – 39.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Literature and Law Lite: Approaches in Surveys and General Education Courses.” Teaching Law and Literature (MLA Options for Teaching Series). Eds. Matthew Anderson and Catherine O. Frank. July 2011. 268 – 275.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Stoker’s Dracula and the Vampire’s Literary History.” Critical Insights: Dracula. Ed. Jack Lynch. Ipswich, MA: Salem Press. September 2009. 23 – 37.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Nathaniel Hawthorne and the Canon of American Literature.” Critical Insights: Nathaniel Hawthorne. Ed. Jack Lynch. Ipswich, MA: Salem Press. September 2009. 21 – 32.

Marshall, Bridget M. and Brian Ogilvie. “‘There shall be a wonder in Hadley!’: Mary Webster’s ‘Hideous Witchcraft.’” Cultivating a Past: Essays in the History of Hadley, Massachusetts. Ed. Marla Miller, University of Massachusetts Press. May 2009. 135 – 153.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Salem’s Ghosts and the Cultural Capital of Witches.” Spectral America: Phantoms and the National Imagination. Ed. Jeffrey Weinstock. The University of Wisconsin Press. June 2004. 244 – 263.

Marshall, Bridget M. Contributing Editor and Author of “Biographical Sketch,” “Story Behind the Story,” “List of Characters,” and “Summary & Analysis” for Bloom’s Guide to Pride and Prejudice. Chelsea House Publishers. Fall 2004. 10 – 58.

Marshall, Bridget M. “‘South Park’: For (Im)Mature Audiences Only.” Closely Watched Brains. Eds. John Sakeris and Murray Pomerance. Boston: Pearson Education, 2001. 121-134.

Journal Articles

Marshall, Bridget M. "'There is a secret down here, in this nightmare fog': Urban-Industrial Gothic in Nineteenth-Century American Periodicals."  Women's Studies. 46.8 (2017): 767-784. Available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/eUjtsrmkiJEnnpHk9HWQ/full

Marshall, Bridget M. “Making Stories Matter Inside and Outside the Classroom: Service Learning in a Disability in Literature Course.” Transformations: The Journal of Inclusive Scholarship and Pedagogy.  Teaching Disability Issue. 25.2 Winter 2016.   65 – 77.

Elbert, Monika M, and Bridget M. Marshall. “Introduction: Haunted Hawthorne, Hawthorne’s Hauntings.”  Nathaniel Hawthorne Review.  38.2  Fall 2012.  ii - xiv.

Marshall, Bridget M. “An Evil Game: Gothic Villains and Gaming Addictions.”  Gothic Studies. 11.2. Special Issue on Addiction.  Ed. Carol Margaret Davison. November 2009. 9 – 18.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Reading New England Witchcraft Trials: The Case of Mary Parsons.”  Massachusetts Center for Renaissance Studies Newsletter Spring 2002: 13 – 16.

Marshall, Bridget M. “The Face of Evil: Phrenology, Physiognomy, and the Gothic Villain.”  Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies (HJEAS) 6.2 (Fall 2000): 161 – 172.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Caddy and Quentin: Last Action Heroines.”  The Lehigh Review 5 (1997): 89-98.

Articles in Scholarly Web-Based Publications

Marshall, Bridget M. “Teaching the Early American Literature Survey: Expanding the Canon Using Internet Resources.” Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice. Special Edition: Teaching Electronically. 2.4 Winter 2009. http://www.cpcc.edu/taltp/archives/winter-2009-2-4/marshall_winter_2009.pdf/view

Marshall, Bridget M. “Teaching Bierce’s ‘The Boarded Window’ for Practice in Close Reading.’” The Ambrose Bierce Project Journal. Fall 2008. Vol. 4, No. 1. Penn State Erie. http://www.ambrosebierce.org/journal4marshall.html

Marshall, Bridget M. The Goody Parsons Witchcraft Case: A Journey into 17th-Century Northampton. Principal Researcher, Writer, and Curator for entire web site at http://ccbit.cs.umass.edu/parsons/

Marshall, Bridget M. “Witch Trials.” Source List. The Infography. http://www.infography.com/ November 2001.

Reference Articles

Marshall, Bridget M. “Journey into Mohawk Country.” Critical Survey of Graphic Novels: Independents & Underground Classics. Ed. Bart Beaty and Stephen Weiner.  Salem Press.  May 2012.  424 – 428.

Marshall, Bridget M. “Vathek.’” Encyclopedia of Literary Romanticism. Facts on File. October 2010. 471 – 472.

Marshall, Bridget M. “The Jolly Corner,” The Critical Companion to Henry James. Eds. Kendall Johnson and Eric Haralson. Clearmark Books, Facts on File. August 2009. 255 – 260.

Marshall, Bridget M. “New York City,” The Critical Companion to Henry James. Eds. Kendall Johnson and Eric Haralson. Clearmark Books, Facts on File. August 2009. 420 – 422.

Reviews

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of Gothic Subjects: The Transformation of Individualism in American Fiction, 1790–1861 by Siân Silyn Roberts.   Modern Philology. 12.4 (May 2015).  330 – 332.

Marshall, Bridget M.  Review of Witches, Wife Beaters, and Whores: Common Law and Common Folk in Early America by Elaine Forman Crane.  Early American Literature.  48.1 (2013). 248 - 252.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of The Entanglements of Nathaniel Hawthorne: Haunted Minds and Ambiguous Approaches by Samuel Chase Coale. The Nathaniel Hawthorne Review. 38.1 (Spring 2012). 94 – 98.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of Discerning Characters: The Culture of Appearance in Early America by Christopher Lukasik. Studies in the Novel. 43.3 (Fall 2011). 376 – 378.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of The Poetics and Politics of the American Gothic: Gender and Slavery in Nineteenth-Century American Literature by Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet. The Review of English Studies. 62.256 (2011). 666 – 668.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of From Demons to Dracula The Creation of the Modern Vampire Myth by Matthew Beresford, Dark Places: The Haunted House in Film by Barry Curtis, and A Philosophy of Fear by Lars Svendsen. Kritikon Litterarum: International Book Review for American, English, Romance, and Slavic Studies. 37 (2010). 104 – 112.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of Confessions of a Poisoner, Written by Herself. Modern Language Studies. 40.1 (2010). 92 – 94.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of Contemporary Gothic. By Catherine Spooner. Kritikon Litterarum: International Book Review for American, English, Romance, and Slavic Studies. 35 (2008). 84 – 88.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of Captivating Subjects: Writing, Confinement, Citizenship, and Nationhood in the Nineteenth Century. Edited by Jason Haslam and Julia M. Wright. Kritikon Litterarum: International Book Review for American, English, Romance, and Slavic Studies. 34 (2007). 84 – 87.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of Charles Brockden Brown’s Revolution and the Birth of American Gothic. By Peter Kafer. Register of the Kentucky Historical Society. 103.4 (2006). 782 – 783.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of Lucifer Ascending: The Occult in Folklore and Popular Culture. By Bill Ellis. and Crimes of Art + Terror. By Frank Lentricchia and Jody McAuliffe. Kritikon Litterarum: International Book Review for American, English, Romance, and Slavic Studies. 32 (2005). 133 - 136.
Marshall, Bridget M. Review of Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Text Reader. Edited by Gail Dines and Jean M. Humez (Sage Publications, 2003). M/C Reviews http://reviews.media-culture.org.au/article.php?sid=599 February 2003.

Marshall, Bridget M. Review of Nursery Realms: Children in the Worlds of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Edited by Gary Westfahl and George Slusser (University of Georgia Press, 1999). Scope: An On-Line Journal of Film Studies. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/film/journal/ August 2001.

GRANTS

U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime Grant for Integrating Crime Victims’ Issues into University and College Curricula.
“First Year Writing with Crime Victim Statements” Course module developer.
Criminal Justice Department, Linda Williams, Alison Cares, Eve Buzawwa, and David Hirschel, Principal Investigators 2010 - 2011. ($297,272)

NEH funded Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for K-12 Teachers: “Inventing America: Lowell And The Industrial Revolution” through the Tsongas Industrial History Center, Chad Montrie and Sheila Kirschbaum, Principal Investigators, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012.

Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Curriculum Development Grant for The Goody Parsons Project, Historic Northampton.  Principal Researcher, Writer, and Curator.  2002.

Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Mini-Grant for The Goody Parsons Witchcraft Trial Project, Historic Northampton.  Principal Researcher, Writer, and Curator.  2001.

Graduate School Travel Grants 1999, 2000, and 2002.

English Department Travel Grants 1999, 2000, and 2002.

PRESENTATIONS and CONFERENCES

“Fright Factories: Nineteenth-Century Industrial Gothic.”

              Gothic Hybridities: International Gothic Association Conference.

              Manchester, England. 31 July – 3 August 2018.

“Just Down the Road from Thoreau: Lowell’s Mill Girls and Transcendental Industrialization.”

              C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists Fourth Biennial Conference.

              State College, Pennsylvania. 17 – 20 March 2016.

“‘White Slaves of the North’ Rhetoric and the Real Mill Girls of Lowell.”

              Society for the Study of Southern Literature Conference.

              Boston, Massachusetts.  10 – 12 March 2016.

“Migrating Mill Girls: The Circulation of the Gothic in the Mills of Lowell, Massachusetts.”
International Gothic Association Conference.
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 28 July – 1 August 2015.

“Pauline Hopkins and the Gothic Tradition: The Self-Destroying Gothic Villain.”
American Literature Association Conference..
Boston, MA. 21 – 24 May 2015.

“Memorializing Lowell’s Mill Girls: Public Art and Public Arguments.”
Deerfield-Wellesley Symposium: Outside the Gallery: Public Sculpture in New England.
Deerfield, MA.   14 March 2015.

“Literary Manufacturing: The Mill Workers (and Writers) of Lowell, Massachusetts.”
Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA) Conference.
Boston, MA.  March 2013.

“‘There is a secret down here, in this nightmare fog:’ Urban-Industrial Gothic in Nineteenth Century American Literature.”
American Literature Association Symposium: “Fear and Form: Aspects of the Gothic in American Culture.”
Savannah, GA.  February 2013.

Journey into Mohawk Country as Primary Source and Comic Book.”
Society of Early Americanists Conference.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. March 2011.

“Life Near the Mills: Teaching Rebecca Harding Davis with Online Resources.”
American Literature Association Conference.
San Francisco, California.  May 2010.

“Mary Webster’s ‘Hideous Witchcraft’ in Hadley”
Hadley’s 350th Anniversary Conference Invited Speaker.
Hadley, Massachusetts.  October 2009.

“Bringing Primary Documents into the Classroom.”
Landmarks of American History and Cult
ure Workshops for K-12 Teachers.
Tsongas Industrial History Center, Lowell, Massachusetts.  Summer 2009.

"Expanding Nineteenth Cenutury Literature with Web Resources."

           American Literature Association Conference.

           Boston, Massachusetts. May 2009.

"Approaches and Responses to Teaching Comics in Literature Courses: Two Case Studies."

           Joint Conference of the National Popular Culture and American Culture Associations.

           New Orleans, Louisiana. April 2009.

“Using Primary Documents in the Classroom.”
Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for K-12 Teachers.
Tsongas Industrial History Center, Lowell, Massachusetts.  Summer 2008.

“Primary Sources as Primary Resources.”
Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for K-12 Teachers.
Tsongas Industrial History Center, Lowell, Massachusetts.  Summer 2007.

“Internet Primary Sources and How to Use Them.”
Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for K-12 Teachers.
Tsongas Industrial History Center, Lowell, Massachusetts.  Summer 2006.

"Gothic Revival, Kid Style: Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events."

           Joint Conference of the National Popular Culture and American Culture Associations.

           Atlanta, GA.  April 2006.

"Defying American Slavery: The Bondwoman's Narrative as American Gothic."

            International Gothic Association Conference.

            Montreal, Quebec, Canada.  August 2005.

"American Gothic II "  Panel Chair.

Deviance and Defiance, Conference of the International Gothic Association.

Montreal, Quebec, Canada. August 2005.

"Local History Resources Online:  Integrating the Internet and Interactivities into the Classroom."

            Workshop for Northampton Area Teachers at the Smith College Campus School

            Northampton, MA.  April 2004 .

"Historic Northampton's Bewitching History:  Goody Parsons in Print and Online."

            Talk presented with John Demos for Northampton's 350th Anniversary Celebration.

            Northampton, MA.  March 2004.

"Colonial Witchcraft from Western Massachusetts to Salem."

History Summer Institute for Teachers; Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association.

Deerfield, MA.  July 2003.

"Mary (Reeve) Webster, the 'Witch' of Hadley"

Hadley in the Renaissance at the Massachusetts Center for Renaissance Studies.

Amherst, Massachusetts.  May 2003.

"The Goody Parsons Witchcraft Case: A Journey into 17th Century Northampton."

            Exhibit Opening at Historic Northampton.

            Northampton, Massachusetts.  October 2002.

"Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, the Law and the Gothic."

Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association (RMMLA) Annual Conference.

Scottsdale, Arizona.  October 2002.

"Interpreting New England Witchcraft Trials: The Case of Mary Parsons of Northampton."

New Frontiers in Early American Literature at the University of Virginia.

Charlottesville, Virginia. August 2002.

"Witchcraft in 17th Century Northampton: The Mary Parsons Case."

Quarterly Speaker Series of the Southampton Historical Society.

Southampton, Massachusetts.  February 2002.

"Mary (Bliss) Parsons: Slander and Witchcraft in Early Northampton."

Monthly Speaker Series of the Greenfield Historical Society.

Greenfield, Massachusetts.  November 2001.

"Reading New England Witchcraft Trials: The Case of Mary Parsons of Northampton."

Four o'clock Colloquia Series of the Massachusetts Center for Renaissance Studies.

Amherst, Massachusetts.  October 2001.

"Slander and Witchcraft in Early Northampton: The Story of Mary Parsons"

Witchcraft in the Old World and the New at the Massachusetts Center for Renaissance Studies.

Amherst, Massachusetts.  September 2001.

"Salem's Ghosts and the Cultural Capita/ol of Witches."

North East Modern Language Association (NEMLA) Annual Conference. 

Hartford, Connecticut. March 2001.

"Salem, Massachusetts: Heritage and Horror."

The Ninth Annual University of Massachusetts Graduate English Conference.

Amherst, Massachusetts. May 2000.

"South Park: For (Im)Mature Audiences Only."

Brainwatching: Intellect and Ideology in Media Culture.

Toronto, Canada. May 2000.

"Student Roles in Group Work."

From Practice to Theory and Back: Perspectives on Composition.

Amherst, Massachusetts. March 2000.

"Dracula."  Panel Chair.

Gothic Spirits/Gothic Flesh, Conference of the International Gothic Association.

Halifax, Canada. August 1999.

"The Face of Evil: Phrenology, Physiognomy, and the Gothic Villain."

Gothic Spirits/Gothic Flesh, Conference of the International Gothic Association.

Halifax, Canada. August 1999.

TEACHING at University of Massachusetts, Lowell

The Gothic Tradition in Literature: An upper-division course for English majors focused on the Gothic from its beginnings to contemporary manifestations.

Disability in Literature: A course fulfilling the General Education requirement in Diversity, and also a required course for students completing the interdisciplinary Disability Studies minor. Course focuses on portrayals of disabilities in literature and popular culture.

American Literary Traditions : A suvey of American Literature from beginnings to the present. Readings include canonical and non-canonical authors and texts.

First Year Seminar for English Majors: A one-credit course for first semester students that provides an introduction to college and the major.

American Literature I: Beginnings to 1859 : A suvey of American Literature from beginnings to 1850, with a focus on gender and genre. Readings include canonical and non-canonical authors and texts.

The Horror Story : A course focused on the gothic and horror stories from Poe and Hawthorne through contemporary times. Readings include Frankenstein and Dracula, as well as a wide range of short stories.

College Writing I : A required introduction to college-level writing for all first year students. Using a variety of readings, including the Common Text, students will write and revise a series of essays on a variety of topics.

College Writing II: A required introduction to college-level writing for all first year students. This course will include poetry, prose, and drama, including the Common Text play as starting points for essay writing and revising.

TEACHING at University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Love, Betrayal, and Obsession: Narratives of Relationships Gone Wrong: Introductory literature course exploring novels, stories, and poems that detail the trials of relationships.  Students do a variety of reading and writing, and prepare presentations on authors and stories.  Some of the texts include poetry of Edgar Allan Poe, Helen Whitman, and Emily Dickinson, and short stories by Jhumpa Lahiri, William Faulkner, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.  Fall 2004.

 

Seminar in Literary Studies: Gateway seminar for English majors, focusing on preparation for advanced work in literary studies.  Close reading of Frankenstein, Maus, Curse of the Starving Class, and The Spoon River Anthology provide a variety of genres to consider how literary works employ language to represent the world.  An assortment of short critical pieces relating to these texts and ongoing student-led presentations of literary theories and terms introduce the class to what it means to be an English major.  Fall 2004.

 

American Popular Culture: Culture, Sub-Cultures, and Resistance: Interdisciplinary seminar for new students in the Commonwealth (Honors) College.  Students study a variety of media - film, music, magazines, and television - and explore what they reflect about our culture, as well as how they continue to propagate themselves.  Beyond merely studying popular culture and our relationship with it, readings and discussions consider the possibility of resistance and dissent, as exemplified in sub-cultures and counter-cultures, both historically and today.  Our driving question is what is popular culture doing to us, what are we doing to it, and how (or why) might we change this relationship?   Fall 2001 through Spring 2004.

 

Roll over Beethoven: The History of Rock and Roll: (Teaching Assistant, Smith College) Critical overview of the history of rock'n'roll from the 1950s to the present.  Topics include the political use of music, the role of race in the creation of rock'n'roll, and the importance of gender and sexuality in rock performance.  This American Studies course explores the changing sounds and styles of five decades of rock music, as well as the social and cultural effects of the music.  Lectures by Dr. Steve Waksman.  Spring 2003.

 

American Gothic: History and Horror: An introductory-level American Studies course focused on the genre of the gothic, as manifested in American literature and history.  Course units focus on colonial witchcraft trials, Indian massacres, and slavery, with primary source readings, as well as historical and literary interpretations from different periods.  Students are asked to look critically at the various narratives and the cultural forces that created them, investigating how we frame stories about our own haunted history.  Fall 2001.  Spring 2002. 

 

As the Century Turns: American Literature 1880 - 1910 and 1980 - present: Introductory level English course considers American literature marking the turn of two centuries—the nineteenth and the twentieth—particularly focusing on issues of gender in a changing American society.  Focus on using literature as a way to access and understand the ideology and culture of each period, and in considering connections between these turns.  Works include Kate Chopin's The Awakening (1899), Henry James' Daisy Miller (1878), Toni Morrison's Beloved (1987 - but written about the previous turn of the century), and Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale (1985), as well as a wide variety of short stories.  Spring 2001.

 

New Women, New Men: American Literature at the Turn of the Century: Introductory level course focused on American literature from 1880 to 1910, particularly concerned with gender issues in this period of social and cultural change.  Readings by authors such as Charles Chesnutt, Ambrose Bierce, Mary Wilkins-Freeman, William Dean Howells, Hamlin Garland, and Charlotte Perkins-Gilman.  Students explore how looking back to the previous turn of the century will help us in considering the turn to the 21st century.  Fall 2000.

 

The Gothic Mode: Novels, Short Stories, and Films:  Literature course for advanced undergraduates explores the tropes and structures of the Gothic as manifested in traditional and non-traditional texts, including novels, stories, and horror films.  Students consider how to define the Gothic, the kind of cultural work performed by the Gothic, and the development and emergence of the gothic form from its beginnings in England to its contemporary manifestations in the United States.  Summer 2000.

 

Critiquing Culture and Media: Personal and Academic Essays: Course for first year students fulfilling the College Writing Requirement.  Assignments include studying popular culture objects and texts—toys, advertisements, magazines, news coverage—as objects of critical academic study and close reading.  Class activities focus on writing, revising, editing, reviewing, and publishing student essays, including narratives, arguments, and research papers.  Class format of both workshops and conferences.  Fall 1997 through Spring 2000.

 

Magazine Writing and Analysis: Special section of College Writing Requirement for Commonwealth College students focused on developing essays for a magazine audience.  In addition to writing, revising, and reviewing essays in a variety of forms, students edit class magazines and collectively publish their essays along with letters, art work, advertisements, and associated shorter writing assignments.  Spring 1999.

AWARDS AND HONORS

English Department Teaching Excellence Award (UML) 2010-2011.

Nominated for Student Government Association Exceeding Excellence in Teaching Award (UML), Spring 2010.

Nominated for Student Government Association Exceeding Excellence in Teaching Award (UML), Spring 2009.

Recipient of the English Department Award for Teaching Excellence (UML), 2006 – 2007.

Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellowship, Department of English, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 2004 - 2005.

LeeAnne Smith White Prize for the Best Essay in American Studies, 2003.

Nomination for Distinguished Teaching Award, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Fall 2002.

Certificate for Demonstrating Excellence in Teaching, Division of Continuing Education, University of Massachusetts, based on student evaluations, Fall 1999 and Summer 2000.

Phi Beta Kappa, National Liberal Arts Honor Society.

OTHER PUBLICATIONS

Animal Crackers: A Tender Story about Death and Funerals and Love. Omaha:  Centering Corporation, 1998.  Children's book.

 

DEPARTMENT SERVICE and EXPERIENCE

Associate Chair: Summer 2012 - May 2015.

Interim Chair: Jan 2014 - May 2014.

Commonwealth Honors College Faculty Liaison: Spring 2012.

First Year Student Advisor for English Department: Fall 2011 – Spring 2012.

Common Text Committee: Fall 2005 - Spring 2011

Organizer, Faculty Research Series: Presentations in the Humanities, Fine Arts, and Social Sciences (formerly the Salon). Fall 2006 - present.

Co-Advisor to Student Literary Society

Supervisor for Graduate Student Teachers of Literature Courses:  Fall 2004 and Spring 2005.

Intern, Massachusetts Center for the Book:  Spring 2003.

Intern, Historic Northampton:  Fall 2000 to Spring 2003.

Graduate Employee Organization English Department Steward:  Fall 1997 through Spring 2001. 

Graduate Student English Department Colloquia Coordinator:  Fall 1998 through Spring 2000.

Graduate English Conference Steering Committee:  1998, 1999, and 2002.

Placement Test Reader:  First Year Writing Program, University of Massachusetts, 1999.

Practicum in the Teaching of Writing:  University of Massachusetts, Fall 1997, Spring 1998.

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Modern Language Association

Northeast Modern Language Association

International Gothic Association

Society of Early Americanists

American Studies Association

American Association of University Professors

 

 

 

 

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This page was updated on September 17, 2019.